Video Games

Gaming communities were among the very first to recognize the potential of digital technologies, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation has defended their rights from the very beginning. EFF's first case in 1990 was an unprecedented effort to regain computers unjustly seized by the Secret Service from game maker Steve Jackson Games.

Since then, EFF has continued to protect freedom and innovation in the gaming world, whether we are arguing for the right of gamers to speak anonymously, defending video games from unconstitutional censorship, or protecting your right to resell, modify, or copy the games you have purchased.

Gamers are facing more threats to their freedoms than ever before. Sadly it's routine for companies to force gamers to swallow updates that hobble their systems and routinely trap their users in restrictive, near-incomprehensible terms of service agreements and end-user licenses. But EFF continues to fight for consumers who believe that if you bought it, you own it, and you should be able to put your games and hardware to unexpected and creative uses.

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NSA Spying

EFF is leading the fight against the NSA's illegal mass surveillance program. Learn more about what the program is, how it works, and what you can do.

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The clock is ticking on Section 215 sunset, but the Senate is in stalemate on NSA spying powers: https://eff.org/r.tpwa

May 22 @ 10:58pm

BREAKING: At the behest of @SenateMajLdr, the Senate will meet Sunday, May 31st in the afternoon, mere hours before Section 215 expires.

May 22 @ 10:20pm

BREAKING: Senator Rand Paul objecting to even one more day of extending Section 215.

May 22 @ 10:08pm
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