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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

October 3, 2011
Techdirt

The EFF has sued the government after the administration refused a FOIA request to reveal who is on the Intelligence Oversight Board, which is a "presidentially appointed, civilian panel in charge of reviewing all misconduct reports for American intelligence agencies."

October 3, 2011
NPR: All Things Considered

Julie Samuels, a patent attorney with the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation, is skeptical of Microsoft's motives. She says companies that aren't winning with consumers often assert their patents.

"When faxes started to go out of style, all of a sudden you saw this crazy uptick in litigation among fax companies," Samuels says. "It's because when a party isn't making much money selling their product, they realize they can maybe monetize their patents instead."

October 3, 2011
cdt.org

The threshold question in this case is whether the government's use of GPS technology to track respondents vehicle infringed a reasonable expectation of privacy and therefore constituted a search within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment.

October 3, 2011
L.A. Times

"The Reader Privacy Act will help Californians protect their personal information whether they use new digital book services or their corner bookstore," said Cindy Cohn, legal director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

October 1, 2011
FoxNews.com

“The IOB has a critically important mission – civilian oversight of America’s intelligence activities,” said Mark Rumold, an open government legal fellow with the group.

October 1, 2011
LA Times

"Essentially, each of us is being tailed," said Kevin Bankston, an attorney at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Whether you went to the family planning clinic or a psychiatrist, or to be treated at the cancer specialists' office," data gleaned from cellphones alone reveal "an enormous amount about us."

September 30, 2011
extratorrent.com

The complaint invoked the infringement of The First Amendment. Matt Zimmerman, EFF Senior Staff Attorney, said that domain name seizures could only be considered blunt instruments, causing unacceptable collateral damage to such fundamental rights of the Internet users as freedom of speech.

September 30, 2011
Brian Leher Live

We take a look at the new patent reform law that some tech entrepreneurs don't like with Julie Samuels of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

September 29, 2011
Popular Mechanics

When I asked the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to protecting citizen rights online, people there thought so, too. “I don’t think it’s fair for there to be a regime where everyone has to read every single privacy policy, or people will have one pulled over on them,” media relations director Rebecca Jeschke says. “I don’t want that future; only the marketers want that future.”

September 29, 2011
Poynter.org

That could be bad for news publishers and for society, said Rebecca Jeschke, spokeswoman for the digital privacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation.

“Are we not going to read about things and look at things and learn about things, because we’re scared about what someone might think about us?” Jeschke said. “That chilling effect is really concerning.”

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