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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 8, 2012
boingboing

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has selected some of the best submissions from the Copyright Office's review of whether it should continue to be legal in the USA to "jailbreak" your devices in order to make them more suited to their needs. In this post, we hear from a deaf man who jailbreaks his phone so that he can use it as an assistive device at work; a military worker in Kuwait who jailbreaks his phone so he can quickly access the flashlight function to scare off dangerous wildlife near the base; and a nurse whose jailbroken device allows her to "track my performance, treatments used on patients, and the effects of those treatments, much faster with customizations that are not available on a device that is not jailbroken."

February 8, 2012
Reuters

But Cox wasn't done fighting yet. She sought a new trial in January. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) also filed an amicus brief in support of her case. They argued that the award against Cox should be overturned in the interest of free speech.

February 8, 2012
CaliforniaWatch.org

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and others counter that attempts to mandate data retention, as it’s known, are shot through with shortsightedness. They say such sensitive private information could be leaked accidentally by companies, IP addresses are not always reliable enough to identify perpetrators, and web users could be “chilled” into dodging sites that contain unpopular political opinions or discuss potentially embarrassing medical conditions. 

February 7, 2012
DenverPost.com

Maintaining multiple Google accounts, though, can be "a somewhat laborious process," the Electronic Frontier Foundation wrote in a blog post last week.

"To help users who wish to keep separate accounts, Google should make the process simpler and easier," the digital rights group said.

February 7, 2012
CNN.com

"It looks like Twitter built it, and they came," said Eva Galperin, an activist with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which defends free speech and privacy online.

As far as she knows, the Brazil case represents the first time a government has sought to make Twitter delete content since the company announced it would do so in countries that require it.

February 7, 2012
Washington Times

The Electronic Frontier Foundation also is “concerned about the implications for surveillance by government agencies,” said attorney Jennifer Lynch.

February 7, 2012
boingboing

To highlight the need for a jailbreaking exemption, EFF has made this video showing how Sony shipped its PlayStation 3 with the promise that users could run GNU/Linux on it, a promise that was taken up by many purchasers, including the USAF, who used a room full of PS3s running Linux to make a clustered supercomputer. But Sony changed its mind and revoked the feature after the fact and began to actively pursue legal penalties against researchers who attempted to restore it.

February 6, 2012
The Verge

11
inShar
A coalition of 75 groups including Reddit, Mozilla, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Public Knowledge, Open Congress, and Human Rights Watch, have sent an open letter to Congress asking it to put the brakes on intellectual property lawmaking in the wake of the massive backlash against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect-IP Act (PIPA).

February 6, 2012
Bloomberg Businessweek

EFF Called ‘Radical Interest Group’ by Adult Film Maker

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a San Francisco-based digital-rights group, was characterized as a “radical interest group” in a court filing by a maker of adult films.

Hard Drive Products Inc. sued 1,495 unidentified defendants in federal court in Washington in September. The suit was related to the defendants’ alleged unauthorized use of the film “Amateur Allure -- MaeLynn” through the BitTorrent file- sharing protocol.

February 6, 2012
Macworld

The email list included members of Fight for the Future, Public Knowledge, CDT, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Free Software Foundation, Mozilla and Demand Progress, a liberal civil liberties group, participants said.

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