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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

August 24, 2010
BBC News

"We have over the past several years seen a new form of political activism emerge online that involves 'credibly impersonating' public officials and corporate executives for the purposes of political satire," said Ms McSherry.

"The way it works is that this impersonator makes an outrageous statement to cause a press controversy and bring attention to an issue.

"It is important that for this to work, one credibly impersonates the executive or official and I am worried a judge will look at this bill and feel this applies to that kind of speech. The bill does not include enough protections for satire and parody, in my view," she added.

August 23, 2010
Ars Technica

Could similar online events be illegal under the new bill? Should they be? "Temporarily 'impersonating' corporations and public officials has become an important and powerful form of political activism, especially online," says EFF today. "Unfortunately, the targets of the criticism, like the Chamber, have responded with improper legal threats and lawsuits. It would be a shame if Senator Simitian’s bill added another tool to their anti-speech arsenal."

August 23, 2010
Inquirer

"For example, the Yes Men, a group of artists and activists, pioneered "identity correction," posing as business and government representatives and making statements on their behalf to raise popular awareness of the real effects of those entities' activities, like the failure to DuPont to adequately compensate victims of the Bhopal disaster and the U.S. government's destruction of public housing units in New Orleans," the EFF said.

August 20, 2010
MIT Technology Review

Richard Esguerra, an activist with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), says tensions tend to erupt when a DRM scheme violates customers' sense of ownership. "Gamers have an idea that if you bought it, you own it, and that's what's being violated here," he says.

August 18, 2010
Seattle Weekly

The EFF now argues in its brief that "Unless corrected, the District Court's ruling risks creating a perverse incentive for the government to violate the privacy rights of as many citizens as possible in order to avoid judicial review of its actions."

August 18, 2010
Jezebel

The American Civil Liberties Union, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have labeled cases like this one "CyberSLAPPs": frivolous lawsuits with the sole purpose of issuing a subpoena to a Web site or Internet Service Provider (ISP) to discover the identity of an anonymous critic and to intimidate or silence them. Cohen's decision to drop her lawsuit a day after she filed it and publicized Port's name lends credence to that label.

August 16, 2010
Network World

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) mapped more than 650 organizations that can issue certificates which will be accepted, directly or indirectly, by Microsoft's Internet Explorer and Mozilla's Firefox. The EFF will soon launch the SSL Observatory Project, "an effort to monitor and secure the cryptographic infrastructure of the World Wide Web. There is much work to be done, and we will need the help of many parties to make the HTTPS-encrypted web genuinely trustworthy... Browsers trust a very large number of these CAs, and unfortunately, the security of HTTPS is only as strong as the practices of the least trustworthy/competent CA."

August 13, 2010
Seattle Weekly

The EFF now argues in its brief that, "Unless corrected, the District Court's ruling risks creating a perverse incentive for the government to violate the privacy rights of as many citizens as possible in order to avoid judicial review of its actions."

August 13, 2010
The New York Times

Computer security researchers are raising alarms about vulnerabilities in some of the Web’s most secure corners: the banking, e-commerce and other sites that use encryption to communicate with their users....
“It is becoming one of the weaker links that we have to worry about,” said Peter Eckersley, a senior staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an online civil liberties group.

August 11, 2010
New York Times

“I’d say very few people know about geotag capabilities,” said Peter Eckersley, a staff technologist with the Electronic Frontier Foundation in San Francisco, “and consent is sort of a slippery slope when the only way you can turn off the function on your smartphone is through an invisible menu that no one really knows about.”

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