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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

August 30, 2010
Ars Technica

The Electronic Frontier Foundation made these two issues central to its own opposition to the US Copyright Group's methods. Appearing two months ago before Judge Rosemary Collyer, EFF's Corynne McSherry argued that both jurisdiction and joinder were improper in cases that lumped thousands of accused file-swappers into a single lawsuit.

August 30, 2010
Wired News

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has received “several dozen” inquiries from Righthaven defendants seeking legal representation, said Eva Galperin, the EFF’s referral coordinator.

“We’re up to our armpits in Righthaven defendants,” she said in a telephone interview.

August 30, 2010
San Francisco Chronicle

"Wouldn't it have been nice if that photo service had stripped the data from your friend's photos?" said Rebecca Jeschke, a spokeswoman for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Or if they'd asked her, 'Are you sure you want this published?' first. Unfortunately, there aren't any easy answers for consumers right now."

August 27, 2010
Slate

A better solution is to clean up the certificate authority lists and revoke the rights of organizations who could abuse it. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, where I used to work, recently published an open letter to Verizon asking them to consider publicly revoking the certificate authority that the company granted Etisalat. But that still leaves the hundreds of other certificate authorities that could turn rogue and start spying on the Web's secure systems.

August 26, 2010
MediaPost

The digital rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation said this week that it's seeking to help bloggers and other defendants who are being sued by the copyright enforcement outfit Righthaven.

August 26, 2010
Editor and Publisher

When Righthaven finds such material from a client, it acquires rights to the material and sues the online publisher that used it. Faced with substantial Copyright Act damages, defendants often settle for lower amounts. The EFF's announcement states that the "lawsuits are of particular concern because they sometimes target the operators of political websites who re-publish newspaper stories, chilling political speech."

August 25, 2010
San Francisco Chronicle

"Location is a stream of information that is quite potent and quite personal and allows people to get a real read on your life," said Kurt Opsahl, senior staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation of San Francisco. "The question people should ask themselves is, is that something they want to do?"

August 24, 2010
Computerworld

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined Apple's patent application for, in the patent's words, "identifying unauthorized users of an electronic device." The patent application is number 20100207721, and was filed on August 19.

The EFF's blog notes that:

Apple's patent provides for a device to investigate a user's identity, ostensibly to determine if and when that user is "unauthorized," or, in other words, stolen. More specifically, the technology would allow Apple to record the voice of the device's user, take a photo of the device's user's current location or even detect and record the heartbeat of the device's user.

August 24, 2010
Inquirer

It was already known that Apple could remotely disable an Iphone, something that occurred when one of its employees had lost an Iphone 4 prototype in a bar. Although, given the number of faults the Iphone 4 has, it's equally likely that the device was just operating normally. However, this patent goes further than just disabling lost phones with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) calling it "downright creepy and invasive".

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