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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 8, 2011
Political Fail Blog

Last week, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) released an explosive new report documenting the lawless, constitutional-free zone under construction in America for nearly a decade.

February 8, 2011
NetworkWorld.com

When it comes to the FBI, plenty of surveillance abuse has been documented. The EFF recently released a report that "FBI intelligence investigations have compromised the civil liberties of American citizens far more frequently, and to a greater extent, than was previously assumed." After analyzing about 2,500 pages of FBI documents, the EFF discovered it takes about 2.5 years after the FBI commits an intelligence violation before it is reported to the Intelligence Oversight Board. The EFF also reported on "serious misconduct by FBI agents including lying in declarations to courts, using improper evidence to obtain grand jury subpoenas, and accessing password-protected files without a warrant."

February 7, 2011
KGO-TV San Francisco, CA

"We've seen in Egypt that that's a bad idea to give one person unilateral power to control how people in his or her country can communicate. And we don't want the president of the United States to have that and we don't want the leader of any country to have that," says Rebecca Jeschke from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

February 7, 2011
Techdirt

We've been pointing this out for years, but it seems that many of the "tech elite" are so focused on the phrase "net neutrality" that they're willing to jump on any sort of regulation that says it's "net neutrality." So, it's nice to see that the EFF is not following suit, but instead is warning that the FCC does not have the regulatory mandate to do what it's trying to do with net neutrality -- and if it is given that control, it will inevitably lead to much more internet regulation that we will all come to regret.

February 7, 2011
InformationWeek

The number of defendants -- nearly 100,000 -- in P2P cases exceeds previous estimates. For example, in an amicus brief filed last month in support of 500 accused file sharers, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) estimated that roughly 75,000 people had been sued in 2010 for alleged copyright violations involving pornographic movies. It noted that nine lawsuits in the Northern District of Illinois alone had collectively involved 4,507 people, meaning that each lawsuit named about 500 defendants.

February 6, 2011
Pacific Free Press

As mass revolt spreads across Egypt and the Middle East and citizens there demand jobs, civil liberties and an end to police state abuses from repressive, U.S.-backed torture regimes, the Obama administration and their congressional allies aim to expand one right here at home.

February 4, 2011
Wired.com

“In general, we think arguments that regulating the internet is ‘ancillary’ to some other regulatory authority that the FCC has been granted just don’t have sufficient limitations to stop bad FCC behavior in the future and create the ‘Trojan horse’ risk we have long warned about,” Phillips said.

February 4, 2011
The Star-Ledger

As the article indicates, you can’t just assume it’s okay to post an image or other material just because you’re using it for noncommercial purposes, you’re giving credit, or you’ve asked for permission and haven’t heard back. The Bloggers’ Legal Guide, from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (see eff.org/issues/bloggers/legal/liability/IP), includes additional information on what’s permitted and delves into some of the subtleties of intellectual property law.

February 4, 2011
Techdirt

We recently wrote about the odd situation in which mass copyright letter sender lawyer Evan Stone hastily, but petulantly, dropped a case, after the lawyers representing the defendants (from Public Citizen and the EFF) noticed that he appeared to have totally ignored the fact that the court had not allowed him to issue subpoenas, and had gone ahead and issued them anyway. Rather than respond to any of the questions that Public Citizen lawyer Paul Alan Levy asked Stone, he just dropped the case. Levy has now put up a blog post digging into the details, including why this move was more or less an admission by Stone that he'd made a huge mistake. The key point, though, is that Public Citizen and EFF appear to be planning to continue to pursue the motion to make sure that Stone did not contact any of those sued directly.

February 3, 2011
NPR - Marketplace

Rebecca Jeschke is at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. She says some of the sites that have been seized were legitimate businesses that didn't have a chance to respond to allegations that they were violating copyrights. Others were search engines offering links.

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