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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 12, 2011
mptywheel.firedoglake.com

EFF’s Kevin Bankston provides some context.

“This is the answer to a mystery that has puzzled us for more than a year now,” said Kevin Bankston, a senior staff attorney and expert on electronic surveillance and national security laws for the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation.

February 11, 2011
Techdirt

It's using the judicial system as a business model. In one of the lawsuits Stone filed for Mick Haig Productions, the judge wisely asked Public Citizen and EFF to act as counsel for the John Does who had been sued, to represent their interests before allowing Stone to move forward with the discovery process (which would allow him to subpoena ISPs to get the names associated with various IP addresses). Public Citizen and EFF filed motions concerning some of the problems with the overall case and the judge refused to allow discovery while considering those motions.

February 10, 2011
PBS Mediashift

We convened a group of privacy experts, journalists and publishers to discuss -- and debate -- the limits to what companies and government could track about us online. Check it out! (With EFF Senior Staff Attorney Lee Tien.)

February 10, 2011
PCWorld

In response to my criticisms of the Mozilla approach, the EFF spokesperson explained, "The tracking we're most worried about is conducted by large third-party domains. These are giant sites that are tracking most of us, most of the time, but we never see them because they're hidden inside iframes and JavaScript beacons in the pages we're looking at. Among those very large domains, we believe it will be comparatively easy to determine which ones do and don't respect the Do Not Track header."

February 9, 2011
PCMag.com

EEF legal director Cindy Cohn said that the government's request for access to these Twitter accounts "raises serious First and Fourth Amendment concerns."

"It is especially troubling since the request seeks information about all statements made by these people, regardless of whether their speech relates to WikiLeaks," she said.

February 9, 2011
Techdirt

Thankfully, part of the gag has been lifted, and we now know that the EFF and the ACLU are challenging the info request and are seeking to have more documents in the case unsealed as well, including the Justice Department's original application for the order -- which should explain the reason for requesting the info. Who knows if the court will grant this, but once again, none of this would even be open for discussion if Twitter had just rolled over and handed the feds the info they demanded.

February 9, 2011
FastCompany.com

3. A federal court just ordered the unsealing of motions filed by the EFF and ACLU about the government effort to garner user data from Twitter related to the WikiLeaks Cablegate affair. These motions ask for the unsealing of "still-secret" records of the government's requests, and attempt to overturn the official efforts. The ACLU is concerned at the excessive secrecy of a public body. The next hearing is February 15th.

February 8, 2011
Wired.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union filed the motion to challenge on Jan. 26, as well as a motion to unseal the filing, which was granted Tuesday. The groups have also sought to unseal the Justice Department’s application for the order it served on Twitter, which provides the government’s justification for demanding the information. The demand for the records is part of a grand jury investigation that’s believed to be probing WikiLeaks for its high-profile leaks of classified U.S. material.

February 8, 2011
Wired.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union filed the motion to challenge on Jan. 26, as well as a motion to unseal the filing, which was granted Tuesday. The groups have also sought to unseal the Justice Department’s application for the order it served on Twitter, which provides the government’s justification for demanding the information. The demand for the records is part of a grand jury investigation that’s believed to be probing WikiLeaks for its high-profile leaks of classified U.S. material.

February 8, 2011
McClatchy Newspapers

U.S. Magistrate Judge Theresa C. Buchanan ordered the motions unsealed at the request of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which filed them on behalf of a member of Iceland's parliament whose Twitter records were among those sought, apparently as part of a criminal investigation into how secret U.S. documents allegedly downloaded by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning found their way to WikiLeaks. Two private law firms joined in the filing on behalf of the other two Twitter users.

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