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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 16, 2011
Index on Censorship

n a major speech on internet freedom, US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has warned governments not to restrict online liberty, while saying she opposed confidential leaks. This comes in the midst of uprising and protest in Middle Eastern countries, and as the US attempts to gain access to Wikileaks members’ Twitter accounts. Index on Censorship consulted a number of experts for their verdict. (With EFF International Rights Director Katitza Rodriguez.)

February 16, 2011
cnet.com

Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney Kevin Bankston said this evening that the FBI already can intercept messages on social-networking sites and Web-based e-mail services with existing law. (This was the purpose of the FBI surveillance system known as Carnivore, later renamed DCS1000.)

"Facebook messages and Gmail messages travel in plain text over those same broadband wires for which the FBI demanded wiretapping capability just a few years ago," Bankston said. "Why has that new capability not been sufficient?"

February 16, 2011
New York Times

“The usual reason Web sites give for not encrypting all communication is that it will slow down the site and would be a huge engineering expense,” said Chris Palmer, technology director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an electronic rights advocacy group based in San Francisco. “Yes, there are operational hurdles, but they are solvable.”

February 16, 2011
Dallas Observer

A week ago, we mentioned that Denton lawyer Evan Stone (not to be confused with, you know, Evan Stone) had run afoul of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Public Citizen in his case against hundreds of anonymous folks -- known only by their IP addresses -- for illegally downloading the porn flick Der Gute Önkel over BitTorrent, and subsequently dropped that case.

February 15, 2011
El Espectador

¿Lo que se escribe en Twitter es público? Sí, dice Katitza Rodríguez, experta en asuntos de privacidad en línea y miembro de Electronic Frontier Foundation, una fundación norteamericana que se dedica a analizar y defender los derechos civiles en el entorno digital. “Twitter empezó como un medio de comunicación entre la ciudadanía. Todo lo que se ponga ahí (que no sea un mensaje directo) es público, tanto así que la biblioteca del Congreso de Estados Unidos indexa y archiva los mensajes que son transmitidos a través de esta plataforma”.

February 15, 2011
CNN.com

Two civil liberties groups have squared off against the government as investigators probing the WikiLeaks scandal seek to gain access to Twitter records.

Lawyers for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, Tuesday representing three people government investigators are targeting.

February 15, 2011
Huffington Post

In Las Vegas, lawsuits have been filed over various Review-Journal content, including a graphic showing how the mirrors at the Vdara Hotel at CityCenter focused sunlight at the hotel's pool in a phenomenon that one tourist claimed singed his hair, according to Jason Schultz, co-director of the University of California, Berkeley, Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic.

Corynne McSherry, intellectual property director at the San Francisco-based Electronic Frontier Foundation, said having most cases settled outside court leaves the legal issues surrounding the suits unsettled.

February 14, 2011
The Hill

Leahy has indicated he plans to introduce similar legislation this year even as advocacy groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation have warned the bill could amount to online censorship.

February 14, 2011
Joplin Independent

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) will be in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, for a hearing in a legal battle over the government's demands for the records of several Twitter users in connection with an investigation related to WikiLeaks.

February 13, 2011
Huffington Post

Little wonder, then, that FBI abuses keep mounting. Most recently, a report by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) reveals that since 9/11, the FBI has been responsible for at least 40,000 violations of the law. Most of the violations are of "internal oversight guidelines," while close to one-third were "abuse of National Security Letters," and almost one-fifth are "violations of the Constitution, FISA, and other legal authorities." Specific violations include "failure to submit notification of the investigation of a US person to FBI Headquarters for three years... failure to report a violation within 14 days of its discovery [and] continuing to investigate a US person when the authority to do so had expired."

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