Skip to main content

EFF in the News

EFF in the News

December 7, 2011
Geek.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) wants to change that: it has petitioned the US Copyright Office to make jailbreaking and rooting universally acceptable under law.

December 6, 2011
Information Week

Until two years ago, when the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) won a DMCA exemption, it was technically illegal to "jailbreak" a smartphone like Apple's iPhone. The result of the 2009 exemption, the EFF argues, has been market innovation, as Apple has adopted features introduced first on jailbroken iPhone

December 6, 2011
eWeekEurope

The exemptions would dispel “any legal clouds” that may prevent users from running applications and operating systems not approved by the manufacturer, according to the EFF.

December 6, 2011
PCWorld

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has asked the U.S. Copyright Office to exempt tablet and video game console jailbreaking from Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) provisions and asked vendors to stop opposing the practice.

December 3, 2011
San Jose Mercury News

To find out, I called Eva Galperin, a privacy activist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Generally speaking, I'm a fan of EFF because they're doing important work safeguarding the digital rights of consumers against business and government.

December 3, 2011
Mashable.com

Groups including the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and Electronic Frontier Foundation condemned the intentional service interruption this August, which in turn triggered a new round of protests.

December 2, 2011
Digital Trends

“The DMCA is supposed to block copyright infringement. But instead it can be misused to threaten creators, innovators, and consumers, discouraging them from making full and fair use of their own property,” EFF Intellectual Property Director Corynne McSherry said.

December 2, 2011
Techcitement

It’s time for the rest of the tech industry to shake in their collective boots, because the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the group that was at the forefront of getting the government to expand the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, is at it again, filing  exemptions with the Copyright Office to let you modify pretty much every piece of hardware or electronic media you own.

December 2, 2011
LA Times

Soon after, the online legal advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation said it would represent Eckhart in the matter. The foundation said Carrier IQ's allegations against Eckhart were "entirely baseless" and were "motivated by a desire to suppress Mr. Eckhart's research conclusions, and to prevent others from verifying those conclusions."

December 2, 2011
Voice of America

They responded swiftly, denying the claim, demanding he remove information about the company and threatening Eckhart with legal action. Late last week, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, or EFF, stepped in to provide Eckhart assistance and legal help, and Carrier IQ pulled back.

Pages

JavaScript license information