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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 14, 2012
boingboing

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's SSL Observatory is a research project that gathers and analyzes the cryptographic certificates used to secure Internet connections, systematically cataloging them and exposing their database for other scientists, researchers and cryptographers to consult.

February 14, 2012
pnosker.com

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, ACTA would not only allow for foreign e-commerce sites to easily shutdown its competitors in the U.S., it would also grant the government the ability to track and record your Internet activity through a mechanism called the Universal Internet ID

February 14, 2012
New York Times

To perform their study, the researchers used several databases of public keys, including one at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another created by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a Internet privacy rights group. The foundation’s database results from a project, known as the SSL Observatory, originally intended to investigate the security of the digital certificates that are used to protect encrypted data transmitted between Internet users and Web sites.

February 14, 2012
Computerworld

Similar monitoring by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has already stoked considerable privacy concerns. Groups such as the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have called for more transparency and oversight of such monitoring activities.

February 14, 2012
Courthouse News Service

In a joint amicus brief filed Friday, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Internet Archive, the American Library Association and others urged the St. Louis-based federal appeals court to accept a reduced damage award against Jammie Thomas-Rasset.

February 14, 2012
InformationWeek

That warning comes by way of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a non-profit group devoted to protecting digital rights. According to the organization, numerous dating sites--which are for-profit businesses, after all--sell data on their customers to third parties, including Google and Facebook. Furthermore, many online dating sites suffer from poor information security practices and may not delete profiles or images in a timely manner.

February 13, 2012
WebProNews.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), along with Global Voices Online’s Threatened Voices project, announced a new project called Bloggers Under Fire. The initiative is aimed at putting the spotlight on threats Internet users are facing around the world.

February 12, 2012
PCWorld

EFF points out six major weak points in the security and practices of online dating sites, most of which appeared first among Facebook's menu of privacy eroding and were universally panned, but have never been eliminated.

February 11, 2012
PCWorld

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)--joined by the Internet Archive, the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of College and Research Libraries, the American Library Association, and Public Knowledge--is arguing differently, and Friday it filed a "friend of the court" brief with a federal appeals court in Minnesota asking it to uphold the lower court award.

February 10, 2012
ZDNet.com

The EFF has just published extensive reviews of data practices, standard encryption practices and retention terms from Ashley Madison, Zoosk, Plenty of Fish, eHarmony, Match, Adult Friend Finder, OkCupid and Lavalife.

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