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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

April 20, 2012
guardian.co.uk

"We now have organisations with the ability to stifle free expression with no bill of rights that applies to them – just terms of service," he said. "The EFF have investigated everything we can think of [against this], and all we can find is anti-trust law, and we're not nearly rich enough for that kind of action."

April 20, 2012
Los Angeles Times

"This makes me nervous,'' said Cindy Cohn, legal director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a group that advocates for Web users, including bloggers. "People having the right to speak anonymously is important, so I look carefully at anything that might limit the ability of people to speak anonymously.''

April 20, 2012
WSJ.com

The information, released by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, came to light as the Federal Aviation Administration gears up to advance the widespread use of the drones. By the fall of 2015, Congress wants the agency to integrate remotely piloted aircraft throughout U.S. airspace.

April 19, 2012
CNET.com news

Dan Auerbach, a staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has criticized CISPA, said, "I don't really know what's in this bill and no one really knows because the language is incredibly unclear. It talks about cybersecurity systems, those are so vaguely defined."

April 19, 2012
WebProNews.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has been campaigning furiously over the past few days against the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, better known on the internet as CISPA. The EFF argues that CISPA, which would allow companies to share personal information relevant to any vaguely-defined “cyber threat” with the government and private security agencies, is simply a power grab by the U.S. government and corporations who want to censor the internet

April 19, 2012
CBS5AZ.com

"The language of this bill is dangerously vague, so that personal online activity - from the mundane to the intimate - could be implicated," said Rainey Reitman, activism director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

April 19, 2012
Wired.com

But Anontune could come into the world with a target on its back, even if it operates using completely legitimate methods, according to Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney Corynne McSherry.

"What we're seeing here is a situation where the government is getting much more involved in enforcement, and we know that the U.S. government doesn't like Anonymous all that much anyway," McSherry said in an interview with Wired. Other music services can attempt to cut deals with music labels to avoid legal hot water, but that's not really an option here.

April 18, 2012
Wall Street Journal

The rules, proposed by the open source software project Mozilla, privacy advocate Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Jonathan Mayer, a researcher at Stanford University, surfaced at a meeting organized by the World Wide Web Consortium, a standard setting group.

April 18, 2012
WebProNews.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation recently attached their names to two coalition letters that explain in great detail why CISPA is just so bad. The two letters address two different parts of the proposed legislation that are both equally miserable.

April 18, 2012
The Register

"CISPA would allow ISPs, social networking sites, and anyone else handling Internet communications to monitor users and pass information to the government without any judicial oversight," said EFF Activism Director Rainey Reitman in a statement. "The language of this bill is dangerously vague, so that personal online activity – from the mundane to the intimate – could be implicated."

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