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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

October 30, 2012
The Hill

"We envision a world where sharing one's Internet connection is the norm," Electronic Frontier Foundation activist Adi Kamdar said.  "A world of open wireless would encourage privacy, promote innovation, and benefit the public good, giving us network access whenever we need it."

October 30, 2012
Threatpost

"Technically, when you search for something in Dash, your computer makes a secure HTTPS connection to productsearch.ubuntu.com, sending along your search query and your IP address. If it returns Amazon products to display, your computer then insecurely loads the product images from Amazon's server over HTTP. This means that a passive eavesdropper, such as someone sharing a wireless network with you, will be able to get a good idea of what you're searching for on your own computer based on Amazon product images," Micah Lee of the EFF wrote in an analysis of the Ubuntu Unity issues.

October 30, 2012
CNET News

"Just because Aereo's system sends TV signals to customers doesn't mean that Aereo needs permission from the broadcasters," EFF Staff Attorney Mitch Stoltz said in a statement. "Personal TV transmissions don't violate copyright -- it's a private use that copyright law doesn't reach. This is just a craven attempt by TV executives to profit from technology that they didn't think of first."

October 29, 2012
Law360

In separate amicus briefs, groups including Consumers Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation told the court that Aereo, which assigns users an individual antenna to watch over-the-air broadcasts on a computer, complies with copyright law.

October 29, 2012
Wired News

Just three weeks ago that the Supreme Court closed a six-year-old chapter in the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s bid to hold the nation’s telecoms liable for allegedly providing the National Security Agency with backdoors to eavesdrop, without warrants, on Americans’ electronic communications in violation of federal law. The justices, without comment, declined to review a lower court’s December decision dismissing the EFF’s lawsuit. At the center of the dispute was legislation retroactively immunizing the telcos from being sued for cooperating with the government in Bush’s warrantless spy program.

October 29, 2012
TechNewsDaily

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a consumer privacy advocacy group, posted a simple, 4-step guide to stopping online tracking, because merely activating the "Do Not Track" feature in your Web browser is not enough.

October 29, 2012
MSN

However, your tablets and video game consoles are still not to be tampered with, something the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) will keep fighting for: "If you bought your gadget, you own it, and you should be able to install whatever software you please without facing potential legal threats."

October 29, 2012
California Watch

The point of warrants is to ensure that searches are confined only to those who are the focus of an investigation, added Hanni Fakhoury, a staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. They're also designed to make certain nothing is left to the discretion of individual officers, something framers of the Constitution had in mind after British soldiers prior to the Revolutionary War conducted door-to-door searches at will.

"If you read the warrant affidavit, it has absolutely zero mention at all of IMSI catchers and stingrays or fake cellphone towers or any explanation of the technology," Fakhoury said. "Courts are busy, judges are busy; they rely on the government in good faith to explain what they're doing."

October 28, 2012
Raleigh News and Observer

Created by the nonprofit digital rights advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation, HTTPS Everywhere forces your browser to view Web pages using HTTP Secure, an encrypted technique that can prevent a host of problems when your computer talks with servers that store Web content.

October 28, 2012
The Next Web

Of course, there are numerous other privacy issues at play in our mobile lives. We reached out to Rebecca Jeschke, Digital Rights Analyst at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in San Francisco about what the EFF considers the greatest threats to our mobile privacy.

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