Skip to main content

Kindles and "creative machines" blur boundaries of copyright

EFF IN THE NEWS

Kindles and "creative machines" blur boundaries of copyright

The Authors Guild has come in for a fair amount of ridicule since their executive director, Paul Aiken, claimed that the speech-to-text feature of Amazon's new Kindle 2 violated copyright law, telling the Wall Street Journal: "They don't have the right to read a book out loud"...

Michael Kwun of the Electronic Frontier Foundation argues that it doesn't, for two reasons. First, he says, a "derivative work" must be a work of creative authorship: He cites the copyright statute's definition of "derivative work" as "a work based upon one or more preexisting works . . . which, as a whole, represent[s] an original work of authorship."

Thursday, February 26, 2009
Ars Technica

Related Issues

JavaScript license information