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Amazon Wrangles Warner Into No-DRM Club

Amazon.com (Nasdaq: AMZN) has picked up the third major record label to let the online music retailer sell MP3 songs without digital rights management (DRM) schemes attached. Warner Music Group announced Thursday that Amazon customers can now buy and download songs from its artists... Amazon.com's DRM-free music store, Amazon MP3, launched in September and now boasts 2.9 million songs from more than 33,000 record labels. The company hasn't reported sales figures, but Bill Carr, Amazon.com's vice president of Digital Music, said its customers are delighted with Amazon MP3 and that the company has received thousands of e-mails thanking the company for offering DRM-free MP3 tracks.

"Ironically, it seems that DRM-free music actually decreases piracy somewhat," Peter Eckersley, a staff technologist for the Electronic Frontier Foundation , told the E-Commerce Times. "There are two reasons for that. One is that despite burning billions of dollars on DRM, nobody has ever implemented a DRM system that prevents any media from being available to pirates -- once media is available to pirates, it can be copied without limit. The second reason is that DRM sucks for the users ... people often choose to pirate stuff not because of the price, or not just because of the price, but because the DRM ruins the product they would have bought," he explained.

Friday, December 28, 2007
E-Commerce Times

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