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White House drone crash fallout shows who really owns your drones, says EFF

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White House drone crash fallout shows who really owns your drones, says EFF

Wait a minute. Do you really own a DJI Phantom drone? Digital rights group the Electronic Frontier Foundation has claimed that the firmware update should be a reminder that while you may have bought the device, its manufacturer still has ultimate control over how it works.

“This announcement may have been an effort by the manufacturer DJI, whose Phantom model is one of the most popular consumer drone units, to avoid bad press and more regulation,” wrote EFF director of copyright activism Parker Higgins in a blog post.

“But it also reinforced the notion that people who ‘own’ these drones don’t really own anything at all. The manufacturer can add or remove features without their agreement, or even their knowledge.”

If this sounds familiar, that’s exactly what the EFF is hoping for. It wants people who use other devices, from smartphones and games consoles to connected cars, to think again about who “owns” these devices.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015
The Guardian

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