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The Revenge Porn of #Twitterpurge

July 22, 2014

As the practice of distributing images and videos of mostly young women without their consent has exploded, government response at the state level has been considerably swift. Eleven states now ban some version of what has come to be known as revenge porn, and around two dozen more are considering similar legislation. There’s also been movement at the federal level led by Rep. Jackie Speier of California. But critics argue that we shouldn’t ban revenge porn because it will impede free speech, most notably the ACLU, which has objected on First Amendment grounds to the majority of legislative efforts around the issue, arguing that the “posting of otherwise lawful speech or images even if offensive or emotionally distressing is constitutionally protected.” Adi Kamdar of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has also opposed revenge-porn legislation, says, “We generally don’t think that finding more ways to put people in prison for speech is a good thing.”

Monday, July 21, 2014
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