Nate Cardozo, a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a privacy group, praised the policy as an important step, though he said he suspected Justice Department attorneys saw "the writing on the wall" and recognized that judges would increasingly begin requiring warrants.

Though the policy does not require local police to follow the lead of federal agencies, "this is going to let the air out of state law enforcement's argument that a warrant shouldn't be required."

"We think that given the power of cell-site simulators and the sort of information that they can collect — not just from the target but from every innocent cellphone user in the area — a warrant based on probable cause is required by the Fourth Amendment," Cardozo said.

Sunday, September 6, 2015
Seattle PI

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