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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

January 25, 2012
Mahsable.com

The idea that you might face criminal charges because you altered your own property is totally unfair,” said Rebecca Jeschke, media relations director and digital rights analyst for the EFF. “The goal here is to make the law really clear.”

January 25, 2012
TECHSPOT.com

The ruling was a clear win for consumer rights but it could be taken away soon, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The EFF reports that the exemption is due to expire this year and is calling on people to make their voice heard not only to renew the exemption, but to also expand it to cover tablets and video games consoles -- which apparently wasn't covered before.

January 25, 2012
USA .com/communities/technologylive

Google's controversial new privacy policy covers familiar territory for Peter Eckersley, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's respected technology projects director.

January 25, 2012
Fast Company

According to Marcia Hoffman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), “This is an important ruling for all Americans […] The Supreme Court has unanimously confirmed that the Constitution prevents unbridled police use of new technologies to monitor our movements.”

January 25, 2012
ZDNet.com

You’d think that would be the end of the story, but you’d be wrong. It turns out that the Electronic Frontier Foundation is asking the US Copyright Office to declare that unlocking the operating system of smartphones does not violate DMCA and the organization is not only calling on them to renew the exception, but to also expand it to cover tablets and video games consoles.

January 25, 2012
boingboing

A federal judge in Colorado recently handed down a ruling that forced a defendant to decrypt her laptop hard-drive, despite the Fifth Amendment's stricture against compelling people to testify against themselves. The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Marcia Hoffman has commentary on the disappointing ruling:

January 25, 2012
DenverPost.com

But Hanni Fakhoury, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said the organization believes that doesn't matter. He said the foundation would file a supporting brief with the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals when the case gets there.

"We still think the Fifth Amendment protects the compelled disclosure of the password or the decrypted contents of the computer," he wrote in an e-mail.

January 24, 2012
Mashable.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation filed an amicus brief in support of the defendant’s Fifth Amendment plea. In it, the organization said:

“EFF’s interest in this case is the sound and principled application of the Fifth Amendment to encryption passwords and encrypted information stored on computers. EFF submits this brief to help the Court apply the Fifth Amendment privilege against selfincrimination in a manner that ensures the constitutional rights of those who use this technological measure to protect their privacy and security.”

January 24, 2012
Good Morning Silicon Valley

In a Denver Post story laying out the case earlier this month, Hanni Fakhoury, a lawyer for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which filed a brief in support of  Friscou, had said, “if the government wins in this case, and they are able to force her to decrypt the laptop … it’s the erosion of the Fifth Amendment. It’s seeing the Fifth Amendment not keeping up with advances in technology.”

January 24, 2012
The Globe and Mail

This led to a rapidly cascading series of events that has included a dubious cease-and-desist letter from Carrier IQ to Mr. Eckhart, an apology from Carrier IQ after the Electronic Frontier Foundation interceded on Mr. Eckhart’s behalf, letters from several members of Congress, multiple class-action lawsuits against Carrier IQ and its corporate customers, including Samsung and HTC, and a reported U.S. government probe.

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