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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

EFF in the News

January 1, 1970
Wired.com

“Anybody with access to a computer can take an IP address and find out where it is,” says Corynne McSherry, the EFF’s lead copyright litigator. “Why are the courts allowing this when the judges don’t have jurisdiction? They’re allowing a commercial venture of trolls.”

January 1, 1970
SecurityNewsDaily

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) released a guide specifically to answer these questions. EFF investigated the privacy practices of pretty much every e-reader on the market, including Amazon’s Kindle, Barnes and Noble’s Nook, the Sony Reader, iPad and Google Books. The guide is then broken down into seven questions with specifics of each e-reader’s policy on the topic. The guide doesn’t endorse one product over another.

January 1, 1970
Epoch Times

Brought about through collaboration between online rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the anonymous browsing experts at the Tor Project, HTTPS Everywhere is able to encrypt users’ Internet connections while they browse a set of major websites.

January 1, 1970
Huffington Post

Google, Microsoft and Yahoo are the three tech giants already enlisted by the GNI, though their involvement dates back to 2008, when each encountered public criticism for their acquiescence to China's restrictive policies regarding the web. Advocacy groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Center for Democracy and Technology are also members.

January 1, 1970
dailynexus.com

SCALE was first held in 2002, lasted one day and only contained 14 speakers and 20 booths, according to Orv Beach, chair of SCALE’s public relations committee. This year, the event lasted three days, hosted 65 speakers and contained 95 booths on the expo floor from organizations such as Aberdeen, Facebook and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Speeches ranged from discussions on hackerspaces to beginner’s guides on Linux podcasting, with various tracks for system administrators, developers, beginners and general users.

January 1, 1970

Commentator and privacy advocate Katitza Rodriguez asks for an open and honest debate about the possible forthcoming implementation of heightened security and surveillance measures during the Brazilian 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics.

January 1, 1970
Practical eCommerce

"We believe that Mozilla is now taking a clear lead and building a practical way forward for people who want privacy when they browse the web," wrote Rainey Reitman, an EFF activist.

January 1, 1970
International Business Times

However, Facebook uses HTTPS option, that only applies to the website not for other apps. Also last year Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) launched a Firefox extension known as 'HTTPS Everywhere', inspired by Google’s encrypted search option which allows users to encrypt most or all the browser’s communications with other sites. Firefox users can install app by using “HTTPS Everywhere.”

But, as EFF puts it, “As always, even if you're at an HTTPS page, remember that unless Firefox displays a colored address bar and an unbroken lock icon in the bottom-right corner, the page is not completely encrypted and you may still be vulnerable to various forms of eavesdropping or hacking (in many cases, HTTPS Everywhere can't prevent this because sites incorporate insecure third-party content).”

January 1, 1970
appealdemocrat.com

Marcia Hoffman, senior staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an advocacy group devoted to protecting electronic freedom, called the decision "an unfortunate result" and said it sets a "dangerous and far reaching precedent that does not take into account the modern realities of how we live today." The decision is based on physical world realities but does not translate to the digital world. She acknowledged the need to "pat someone down to make sure there is no weapon that would pose a danger to the officer" but she said "cell phones do not pose a threat."

January 1, 1970
NetworkWorld

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) today said it rolled out a version of HTTPS Everywhere that offers protection against "Firesheep" and other tools that seek to exploit webpage security flaws.

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