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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

June 22, 2011
Daily Reporter, Greenfield, IN

"Our personal computers contain an unprecedented amount of highly sensitive personal information like medical histories, financial status, political affiliation and more," said Hanni Fakhoury, a staff attorney with the San Francisco-based Electronic Frontier Foundation, which works to protect people's rights regardless of technology.

June 22, 2011
theregister.co.uk

The Electronic Frontiers Foundation in the US has decided it will no longer accept donations via Bitcoin.

June 22, 2011
ITProPortal.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation on Wednesday filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California against the Redmond, based Microsoft Corp. for misusing the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), Gamasutra reports.

June 21, 2011
ReadWriteWeb

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is firing back at the U.S. government for domain seizures related to a Spanish sports streaming site Rojadirecta..com.

June 21, 2011
PRinside.com

This version of JonDoFox contains a default support for the SSL observatory initiative of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). When connected to the JonDonym anonymization service, JonDoFox will automatically send all SSL certificates received by public web sites to the EFF.

June 21, 2011
Techdirt

Making things interesting is the news that the EFF will no longer accept Bitcoin.

June 20, 2011
Network World

"The DMCA is supposed to be a shield against piracy, not a weapon to smash competition and consumer choice," said EFF Intellectual Property Director Corynne McSherry. "Microsoft is misusing the law in order to sell more accessories and control customers' use of the Xbox."

June 20, 2011
AfterDawn.com

In the filing, the EFF urges the federal court to block Microsoft Corporation's attempt to thwart a competitor offering memory card products for the Xbox 360 games console.

June 17, 2011
Detroit Free Press

"We don't want to be in a situation where the police just decide to throw a tracker on everybody because it's easier," said Rebecca Jeschke, spokeswoman for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

June 17, 2011
Detroit Free Press

The way technology is expanding, privacy advocates say it's possible for police to consistently monitor someone without their knowledge, particularly with tracking devices.

"We don't want to be in a situation where the police just decide to throw a tracker on everybody because it's easier," said Rebecca Jeschke, spokeswoman for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

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