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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 2, 2012
Maui Weekly

The Electronic Frontier Foundation noted that the bill could have been applied to libraries, coffee shops and employers if it had been passed into law.

"This is one of the most poorly drafted pieces of data retention legislation we've ever seen," EFF Activism Director Rainey Reitman wrote.

February 1, 2012
Gizmodo.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has requested that, legally speaking, the courts pull their heads out of their butts. More specifically, it's petitioning for the courts to allow the defendants to fight the case without entering their names in unsealed documents, and also to throw the case out for general stupidity.

February 1, 2012
The Register

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a self-proclaimed people's champion in the battlefield of digital rights, has waded into the controversy around the MegaUpload site, hoping to help legit users of the site to recover their 'lawful' content.

February 1, 2012
Truthout.org

Parker Higgins, activist with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, says the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which represents the major movie studios and is headed by former Democratic Sen. Chris Dodd of Connecticut, was the main player pushing for the passage of these bills.

February 1, 2012
Ars Technica Law and Disorder

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has contributed to many of these cases, arguing—sometimes successfully, sometimes, not—that such cases are an abuse of the judicial process. Yesterday, the EFF filed a brief in the Hard Drive case; by the end of the same day, the Chicago-based lawyer handling the case had responded in amazing fashion. Rather than address any substantive arguments made by the EFF, lawyer Paul Duffy decided simply to attack the group itself.

February 1, 2012
asia.cnet.com

Just a day after MegaUpload's hosting companies agreed to hold off (for two weeks) deleting data from their servers, there's news that one of these companies--Carpathia Hosting--is assisting the EFF in its efforts to identify and locate legal files on the cyberlocker.

A Web site, MegaRetrieval.com has been created for legitimate users to contact the EFF about their plight. There's no guarantee that the non-profit organization will succeed, but at least, it seems like a more realistic avenue for users besides that offered by the Spanish Pirate Party, which is threatening to sue the FBI.

February 1, 2012
Mashable.com

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and Carpathia Hosting have launched MegaRetrieval, a site that aims to assist Megaupload users who are unable to access their data from the service.

January 31, 2012
Vogue

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (eff.org) and other civil liberties groups pointed to the policy’s fine print—which makes life difficult for governments trying to censor tweets, and easy for users trying to evade censorship.

January 31, 2012
The Inquirer

"Megaupload had many lawful customers, yet those people were given no notice that they might lose access to their data and no clear path to getting their property back. Setting aside the legal case against Megaupload, the government should try to avoid this kind of collateral damage, not create it," said the EFF.

January 31, 2012
LA Times

The EFF and Carpathia launched a website Tuesday, Megaretrieval.com, to gather information from "innocent users who stored legitimate, non-infringing files." According to Samuels, EFF attorneys want to give those users some say in what happens to Megaupload's servers. But it's not clear what responsibility, if any, the government has to preserve the data, or how long users can be denied access to their files.

"We’re on a fact-finding mission right now. I don't know the best way forward," Samuels said. "We're asking folks to take a second, take a deep breath, consider the rights of innocent third parties who are caught up in this dragnet and go from there."

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