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EFF in the News

EFF in the News

February 2, 2012
Ars Technica Law and Disorder

In a letter (PDF) sent to the Eastern Virginia US Attorney's office and to lawyers for Megaupload, the EFF asks for all material on the servers to be retained "both for purposes of contemplated future litigation and as a matter of obligation and courtesy to the innocent individuals whose materials have unfortunately been swept up into this case."

February 2, 2012
boingboing

Now the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Rainey Reitman explains it in simple language:

Here’s what you need to know about the substantive changes in the new policy:

February 2, 2012
Reuters

The Electronic Frontier Foundation on Thursday asked federal prosecutors and lawyers for the Megaupload.com file-sharing service to allow users who uploaded material to retrieve it as long as it was not copyrighted material.

February 2, 2012
Information Week

Carpathia, which is working with the nonprofit digital rights advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), created MegaRetrieval to help the EFF "assess the scope of the issue facing Megaupload users who are at risk of losing their data," as well as to "help drive awareness that Megaupload customers can seek legal assistance to retrieve their data," according to a joint statement released by the organizations.

February 2, 2012
Huffington Post

The proposed Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act were "bad laws prepared in secret, but they were defeated once they had to face public opinion," Maira Sutton, international outreach coordinator for the foundation, wrote via email. "The scary thing about secret agreements like TPP ... is that they may already be well along the process by the time the public has a chance to learn about them and speak up, which means that unpopular censorship provisions, like those in SOPA and PIPA, can be slid in under the radar."

February 2, 2012

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, which is worried about a lot of the things that have taken place in the Megaupload case, got on the blower to Carparthia and asked what could be done.

February 2, 2012
Ars Technica Law and Disorder

The new site, megaretrieval.com, hopes to hear from the "multitude of innocent users who stored legitimate, non-infringing files on the cloud-storage service were left with no means to access their data." EFF can't promise that the data will be retrieved, though, and Carpathia says it has no direct access to the content on the servers.

February 2, 2012
Gizmodo.com

After the FBI shut down Megaupload, millions of people were locked out of files they had uploaded to the service. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is calling bullshit on this, and along with Carpathia, MegaUpload’s hosting service, they’ve started MegaRetrieval.com, a new site meant to call attention and serve those affected.

February 2, 2012
boingboing

If you're one of the millions of MegaUpload customers whose data is endangered by the entertainment industry's legal action against the company, EFF wants to help you get your files back. They've teamed up with Carpathia Hosting, the company that hosts MegaUpload's servers, and created Megeretreival.com.

February 2, 2012
The Raw Story

The Electronic Frontier Foundation announced Tuesday that it would try to help users retrieve data from the file sharing website MegaUpload.com, which was shut down by the FBI on January 19 because of alleged copyright infringement.

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