April 15, 2008 | By Kurt Opsahl

FBI General Counsel Questioned on EFF NSL Report

At a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee today, FBI General Counsel Valerie Caproni faced tough questions about the EFF Report on the abuse of a National Security Letter (NSL) to North Carolina State University at Raleigh.

In her testimony, Caproni speculated that this misuse of the NSL might have been the result of a "miscommunication." According to a 2007 report by Caproni's Office of the General Counsel, however, the FBI Charlotte Division "acted upon the advice and direction of FBIHQ [and] Charlotte personnel sought legal advice prior to the service of the NSL." FBI documents show that the NSL at issue was reviewed by the Senior Supervisory Special Agent for the Raleigh office, and then reviewed by the Special Agent in Charge of the Atlanta Division before being signed.

The Raleigh office also reported that "We had our CDC [Chief Division Counsel] and FBIHQ involved in in this throughout the process."

Later documents show that the field agents contacted FBI attorneys for "guidance concerning the matter and the questioned legality of the NSL," including the Acting Chief Division Counsel and legal counsel with the Office of General Counsel.

That's a whole lot of miscommunication.

Rep. Nadler Questioning Caproni on NSLs:

Privacy info. This embed will serve content from youtube.com

Deeplinks Topics

Stay in Touch

NSA Spying

EFF is leading the fight against the NSA's illegal mass surveillance program. Learn more about what the program is, how it works, and what you can do.

Follow EFF

Op-ed from EFF's @ncardozo: if your business model depends on fooling customers, it deserves to fail https://eff.org/r.gjvi

Oct 6 @ 6:17pm

Facebook's name policy harms human rights activists, LGBTQ people, domestic violence survivors, and more.

Oct 6 @ 6:09pm

New Zealand confirms half the TPP countries will be forced to extend copyright term by 20 years. We have to stop it. https://eff.org/r.oygk

Oct 6 @ 3:37pm
JavaScript license information