US v. Lowson

EFF and a coalition of academics and public policy groups are urging a federal judge to dismiss a criminal indictment that could give websites extraordinary power to dictate what behavior becomes a computer crime.

The four defendants in this case are the operators of Wiseguys Tickets Inc. a ticket-reselling service. In its indictment the government claims the four purchased tickets from Ticketmaster by automated means violating Ticketmaster's terms of service and therefore the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). In an amicus brief EFF argues that this prosecution expands the scope of the CFAA beyond what Congress intended grounding criminal liability in whatever arbitrary terms of service that websites decide to impose on users.

Stay in Touch

NSA Spying

EFF is leading the fight against the NSA's illegal mass surveillance program. Learn more about what the program is, how it works, and what you can do.

Follow EFF

Some states are considering charging you $20 for each device you want to use to surf the uncensored Internet. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks...

Apr 22 @ 2:27pm

Don't let U.S. entry screenings get even more privacy-invasive. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks...

Apr 21 @ 4:11pm

EFF's @evacide and ProPublica's @JuliaAngwin talk about protecting your privacy online on @NPR's Science Friday: http://www.sciencefriday.com/...

Apr 21 @ 3:26pm
JavaScript license information