March 28, 2011 | By Julie Samuels

Another New Study Shows That Filesharing Doesn’t Deter Artists From Making Music

Further proof that the recording industry’s oft-repeated claims of the downfall of the entire music industry hold no water: a new report finding that filesharing has led directly to "reduced costs of bringing works to market and a growing role of independent labels." In other words, in the past decade, we have seen more music from independent outlets and at lower prices – something that consumers and music fans should all be happy about.

The study, by University of Minnesota economist Joel Waldfogel, proves just what we’ve been saying as recently as last week – that filesharing (unauthorized or not) has led more artists to create more music, and – just as importantly – more different music. U.S. copyright law is based on a compromise recognized in the Constitution that grants authors (or artists, or musicians) a limited monopoly designed to give those authors an incentive to make their creative works. As we’ve long known and as this study makes clear yet again, even in the face of filesharing, those incentives still exist.


Deeplinks Topics

Stay in Touch

NSA Spying

EFF is leading the fight against the NSA's illegal mass surveillance program. Learn more about what the program is, how it works, and what you can do.

Follow EFF

Are you a developer facing legal threats based on Oracle v. Google? We want to hear from you: https://eff.org/r.m2yr

Jul 1 @ 3:38pm

UK admits it illegally spied on Amnesty International https://eff.org/r.oqml

Jul 1 @ 2:17pm

In the FISA Court, the more things change, the more they stay the same: https://eff.org/r.hmj1

Jul 1 @ 2:01pm
JavaScript license information