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Victory Highlights

Victory Updates

State of Maryland v. Kerron Andrews

State of Maryland v. Andrews is the first case in the country (that we know of) where an appellate court has held the Fourth Amendment precludes using a cell-site simulator (commonly known as a Stingray) without a warrant. In the case, Baltimore Police used a Hailstorm—a device...

In re Telephone Info (Koh)

A federal magistrate judge in San Jose, California denied a government request for historical cell site records, ordering the government to seek a search warrant for the information. The government appealed this order to U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh who requested the Federal Public Defender argue why the Fourth Amendment...

California's Electronic Communications Privacy Act (CalECPA) - SB 178

The California Electronic Communications Privacy Act (CalECPA), S.B. 178, requires state law enforcement to get a warrant before they can access electronic information about who we are, where we go, who we know, and what we do. Introduced by California State Senators Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) and Joel Anderson (R-Alpine),...

United States v. Vargas

In this criminal case, the government installed a pole camera overlooking a defendant's front yard and secretly recorded for more than a month. A federal judge invited EFF to participate as an amicus in the case and in two amicus briefs, EFF argued that prolonged video surveillance of a person's...
Officer Friendly Asks: "May I Search Your Digital Device?"

Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie

EFF and the Center for Democracy and Technology ("CDT") have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to crack down on warrantless searches of cell phones, arguing in two cases before the court that changing technology demands new guidelines for when the data on someone’s phone can be accessed and reviewed by...

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